Cannabis and Thyroid Disease

Cannabis or Medical Marijuana is a very old medicinal herb used for not hundreds but thousands of years to treat a great variety of ailments. Historically, Marijuana was used to treat insomnia, mental issues, pain, inflammation, intestinal conditions and cramping. Now, as modern medicines chimes in, the active ingredients of Marijuana, called Cannabinoids, have been shown to have anti-bacterial, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anxiety reducing properties.

Now,look at the many issuesin Thyroid disease. The condition could be cancerous, there could be an excess or deficiency in iodine, there could be an infection and fluid build up, a benign tumor, cancer, infection or hormonal disorder. The absolutely amazing thing about the Cannabinoids in Marijuana is that they have been shown – in clinical settings – to help every one of the listed conditions.

Your doctor, however, will tell you that modern thyroid disease treatment consits of just taking pill.

While thyroid issues range from somewhat “harmless” goiter to life threatening cancer. Most thyroid issues involve an abnormal production of thyroid hormones. Many Thyroid conditions can be successfully managed, however, side effects are often underestimated. Thyroid medications are often somewhat toxic.

Synthroid LEVOTHYROXINE SODIUM Levothyroxine is used to treat an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). It replaces or provides more thyroid hormone, which is normally produced by the thyroid gland. Side effects include fast or irregular heartbeat;fever, hot flashes, sweating; sleep problems (insomnia); changes in your menstrual periods; or
vomiting, diarrhea, appetite changes, weight changes and HAIR LOSS

Here is the full report on cannabis relieving thyroid symptoms:

https://www.mmjdoctoronline.com/health-news/the-many-ways-cannabis-might-treat-thyroid-disease

 

Thyroid Disease Symptoms

While we are on the subject of treating thyroid disease, here is an example ofhow a doctor views treatment. “Both overand underactive thyroid conditions can be tested for with a simple blood test so if you think you have any of the symptoms detailed above, or you simply don’t feel “right”, it’s worth asking your doctor if this might be worthwhile for you.” Most of all, the comments reveal the truth, so be sure to check them out:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/79836458/the-misery-of-having-an-overactive-or-underactive-thyroid

 

 

 

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