Your Eyebrows: Needing Love After Trauma

Your Eyebrows: Love After Trauma

Your eyebrows may need some love. If you suffer from chronic disease, your eyebrows and lashes may need some attention. Many who suffer from thyroid disease or any of the several other diseases suffer from hair loss that targets your head, eyebrows or eyelashes. Or maybe you were involved in an accident that left you with non-existent eyebrows or eyelashes or even hair on your head. We know how uncomfortable that can make you feel.

In this article by Shauna Magrath, she shares how she applies permanent eyeliner and eyebrows to immediately help clients to feel “normal” again. She shares that they all suffer the same insecurities about their appearance.

 http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/shauna-magrath-cpcp/with-love-and-a-little-ink-i-help-women-feel-beautiful-after-trauma_a_23200729/

 

This article has been all over the internet lately. It is about a mother, Hilary Freeman, who chose not to enroll her 2-year-old in a preschool because the assistant was obese. This mother shares how she observed an obese assistant playing with her daughter, questioning if the assistant could keep her daughter safe, plus the concern about meals with that certain assistant. Now, this mother states that her opinion is not a popular one, but shares that a constant “extremely overweight” presence would be sending her daughter and the other children the wrong message: “That being very fat is normal and—when children adopt role models so readily—even desirable.” She also states that  “Fat positivity—also known as fat acceptance—has gone too far. The author, Angelica Lai, is very critical of this mother and her choice not to expose her daughter to this unhealthy norm of our society.

Since I was raised by a mother who obsessed over how much we all weighed constantly, I understand this mothers concern. I also agree with her about how excess weight can become the norm when all your friends are overweight, as I have friends who shame me because I only eat certain foods in limited amounts. Insulting me over my food choices is okay, but for God’s sake, don’t make any comments on their food order or their weight, because that is considered offensive to them and I have no right to bring that up. Whatever!

The bottom line is this: This mother has made the choice not to expose her daughter to an obese teacher: her choice, her right, her daughter!

https://mom.me/news/133289-mom-decided-against-preschool-because-teacher-was-fat/

Leave a Comment